Monitor the quality of reading in your school – phonics, early reading and reading

Monitor the quality of reading in your school – phonics, early reading and reading

Download our ‘Quality of Reading Monitoring’ document to support your school self evaluation of Phonics, Early Reading and Reading.  Key to improving pupil outcomes in reading, this monitoring document will support your senior leaders and subject leaders.

This is a very useful resource for monitoring Phonics, Early Reading and Reading in your school.

The question prompts are based on the seven Ofsted ‘Evaluation Criteria for Early Reading’.  Each criterion has its own icon, which is evident in the monitoring document and can be helpful for staff to use to identify the different areas of phonics and reading that you will be monitoring and evaluating regularly.

Download now and start your self evaluation of phonics, early reading and reading!

Consider the: DfE The Reading Framework: Teaching the foundations of literacy and Phonics Guidance – updated in January 2022

“Reading is fundamental to education. Proficiency in reading, writing and spoken language is vital for pupils’ success. Through these, they develop communication skills for education and for working with others: in school, in training and at work. Pupils who find it difficult to learn to read are likely to struggle across the curriculum, since English is both a subject in its own right and the medium for teaching. This is why the government is committed to continuing to raise standards of literacy for all.”  

 DfE The reading framework: Teaching the foundations of literacy July 2021 and updated in January 2022

The guidance aims to:

  • set out some of the research underpinning the importance of talk, stories and systematic synthetic phonics (SSP) in the teaching of reading
  • provide practical support for high-quality teaching, including assessment and the importance of ‘fidelity to the programme’
  • support schools to evaluate their teaching of early reading, especially in Reception and year 1, and identify how to improve provision if weaknesses are found
  • explain the importance of systematic phonics teaching for older pupils who are at risk of failing to learn to read because they cannot decode well enough
  • support schools working with parents to help their children learn to read.

The National Curriculum programmes of study for reading consists of two dimensions: language comprehension and word reading.

Language comprehension:

  • the importance of talk and stories and the critical links between these, especially the role stories play in developing young children’s vocabulary and language.
  • explains how teachers might expand children’s store of words through talk throughout the day, within the curriculum and, in particular, through stories.
  • Listening to and talking about stories and non-fiction develops children’s vocabulary, because they meet words they would rarely hear or use in everyday speech.
  • Understanding vocabulary is vital for comprehension and so also for wider learning and progress.
  • The guidance also considers the role of poetry, rhymes and songs in attuning children to the sounds of language.

Teaching word reading and spelling

“The national curriculum is designed to make sure that all children are able to read and write fluently by the time they leave year 6, so that they can make progress at secondary school.”

  • Early and successful teaching of phonics. (SSP: systematic, synthetic, phonics)
  • Understanding that the letters on the page represent the sounds in spoken words underpins successful word reading.
  • Children’s knowledge of the English alphabetic code – how letters or groups of letters represent the sounds of the language – supports their reading and spelling.
  • Why teachers themselves also need to understand the alphabetic code: evidence supports the key role of phonic knowledge and skills in early reading and spelling.

 DfE The reading framework: Teaching the foundations of literacy July 2021 and Phonics Guidance:-

  • recognise the importance of talk
  • accurate assessment
  • building a love of stories and reading
  • head teachers need to prioritise reading
  • make sure every child in their school becomes a fluent reader
  • core principles of teaching reading for children in Reception and year 1
  • teaching of reading for older pupils who have not yet mastered the foundations
  • create a school environment where every child is able to read proficiently
  • developing a genuine love of reading in every child

AIMS:

  • set out some of the research underpinning the importance of talk, stories and systematic synthetic phonics (SSP) in the teaching of reading
  • provide practical support for high-quality teaching, including assessment and the importance of ‘fidelity to the programme’
  • support schools to evaluate their teaching of early reading, especially in Reception and year 1, and identify how to improve provision if weaknesses are found
  • explain the importance of systematic phonics teaching for older pupils who are at risk of failing to learn to read because they cannot decode well enough
  • support schools working with parents to help their children learn to read.

 Leadership and management:

  • roles of school leaders in successfully implementing a programme
  • training and supporting staff to teach reading as effectively as possible
  • Monitor quality of reading education:
    • listen to children reading
    • observe lessons
    • consider schools’ policies for teaching reading
    • take account of the outcomes of phonics assessments & data from the phonics screening checks

 COVID-19 recovery:

  • Accurate assessment to identify next steps
  • Quality-first teaching
  • Listening to and talking about stories
  • Talk about ideas and feelings
  • Develop a love of reading and of books

 Developing children’s spoken language

  • learn to focus and share the enjoyment of the story
  • learn how stories start and finish
  • how a plot unravels and is resolved
  • learn that books can transport them elsewhere
  • introduces children to language that they might not hear in ordinary conversation

Reading for pleasure

  • relationship’ between ‘cognition and motivation, proficiency and engagement’ in reading
  • access to interesting and meaningful reading materials

Children need good language comprehension skills and good word reading to become good readers.

  • Language comprehension (the way in which we make sense of words, sentences and the wider language we hear or read)
  • Decoding (word reading)
    • reading unfamiliar words (words that have not been decoded before) by saying the sounds corresponding to the letters in the words and then blending the sounds together, either aloud or silently
    • reading familiar words accurately and silently ‘at a glance’ 30, that is, no longer saying the sounds consciously.